Cranial Laser and Neurolymphatic Release Technique (CLNRT)
Cranial Laser and Neurolymphatic Release Technique (CLNRT)Palmer College of Chiropractic
Palmer GraduateMember of North American Association for Laser Therapy
Member of North American Association for Laser Therapy

Chiropractic in the News

Get the pain relief you need! Call Dr. Hall to schedule your appointment for Chiropractic care and Laser Therapy today.

Call: (209) 588-8700 to schedule a consultation today.

 Title   Date   Author   Host 

nypost.com

by Claudia Gibson

October 15, 2012

The musculoskeletal system - bones, muscles, ligaments and tendons - is the domain of a chiropractor, who treats patients suffering from back and neck pain, headaches, muscle pain and various other ailments.

While most of us know that chiropractors manipulate a patient's spinal column and joints, they also make diagnoses and perform treatments like massage, acupuncture and ultrasound. A chiropractor uses equipment like TENS (transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation) machines, gravity tables and traction devices to help relieve pressure on the spine. They also may advise patients on overall health issues. Chiropractors aim to help their patients avoid the use of drugs or surgery to alleviate pain.

news.kuwaittimes.net

by Ben Garcia

October 14, 2012

KUWAIT: A chiropractor's is a rare profession anywhere. Many chiropractors in Kuwait are expatriate doctors. Dr Chet Collins, who comes regularly to Kuwait from the United States under a contract signed with Missoni Hotel, is one of them.

He treats Kuwaiti patients at the Six Senses Resort and Spa located at the Missoni Hotel. Currently based in Bali, Indonesia, Collins visits on a quar terly basis. "I stay usually between 10 days to two weeks. I focus on treatment and motion therapy. I do a lot of one on one restoration therapy," he said.

voxy.co.nz

October 14, 2012

Manual joint adjustments and stretching should be used as part of the care of osteoarthritis particularly of the hip, according to the latest gold standard recommendations published by the UK National Institute of Clinical Evidence (NICE).

The New Zealand Chiropractors' Association points out that manual care as practised by chiropractors is highlighted in the new recommendations citing strong evidence for the benefit of joint adjustments alone compared with exercise instead of early use of pharmaceuticals.

forbes.com

by David Maris

October 10, 2012

Pay attention, as I can't say this seriously enough. Last week, the FDA took a drug off the market, and the reasons should send shivers of fear down the backs of consumers, investors, generic drug companies - and the FDA.

The FDA announced last week that the 300mg generic version of Wellbutrin XL manufactured by Impax Laboratories and marketed by Teva Pharmaceuticals was being recalled because it did not work. And this wasn't just a problem with one batch - this is a problem that has been going on with this particular drug for four or five years, and the FDA did everything it could to ignore it. The FDA apparently approved this drug - and others like it - without testing it. The FDA just assumed if one dosage strength the drug companies submitted for approval works, then the other higher dosages work fine also. With this generic, American consumers became the FDA's guinea pigs to see if the FDA's assumption was right. It wasn't.

chiro.org

by Frank M. Painter, D.C.

September 27, 2012

A new study of Medicare cost data completed in June by the well-known Washington, DC-based firm Muse & Associates helps prove the cost-saving impact that chiropractic care has on the current federal Medicare program.

The study, titled "Utilization, Costs, and Effects of Chiropractic Care on Medicare Program Costs," was commissioned by the ACA and is the first study of its type to compare the global, per capita Medicare expenditures of chiropractic patients to those of non-chiropractic patients receiving care in the federal Medicare program. The study utilizes data obtained from Medicare's Standard Analytical Files for 1999--the most recent year cost data is available for analysis. The study's executive summary states: "The results strongly suggest that chiropractic care significantly reduces per beneficiary costs to the Medicare program. The results also suggest that Chiropractic services could play a role in reducing costs of Medicare reform and/or a new prescription drug benefit."

CNS News

by Lindsey Tanner

September 10, 2012

Acupuncture gets a thumbs-up for helping relieve pain from chronic headaches, backaches and arthritis in a review of more than two dozen studies - the latest analysis of an often-studied therapy that has as many fans as critics.

Some believe its only powers are a psychological, placebo effect. But some doctors believe even if that's the explanation for acupuncture's effectiveness, there's no reason not to offer it if it makes people feel better. The new analysis examined 29 studies involving almost 18,000 adults. The researchers concluded that the needle remedy worked better than usual pain treatment and slightly better than fake acupuncture. That kind of analysis is not the strongest type of research, but the authors took extra steps including examining raw data from the original studies.

prwire.com.au

August 21, 2012

Even children who are otherwise healthy but who walk on their toes because of spending too much time in baby walkers may be setting themselves up for posture problems in later life.

Toe-walking is a condition where children walk on their toes instead of using a typical gait. According to the study to be published in the August issue of Pediatrics[1] as many as one in 20 children may predominantly walk on their toes in early childhood. The study points out that children who have developmental delays or neuropsychiatric disorders are more likely to walk on their toes.

alternet.org

August 10, 2012

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is engaged in a turf war over the right to give nutritional advice -- and sell it to the highest bidder.

When Steve Cooksey was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, a registered dietician advised him to eat a low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet. Rather than follow that advice blindly, Cooksey read the available scientific literature and decided to do roughly the opposite of what he'd been advised. He proceeded to lose 78 pounds on a high-fat, low-carb diet that was nearly absent of processed foods. Cooksey's blood-sugar level dropped into the normal range, and he was cleared by his doctor to stop taking insulin. Three years later, Cooksey remains slim and healthy, but now finds himself with a different sort of diet problem, thanks to a letter he received from the North Carolina Board of Dietetics/Nutrition. It accused him of practicing nutrition counseling without a license, and threatened to charge him with crimes that could result in jail time if he refused to make changes to his blog, diabetes-warrior.net.

npr.org

by Scott Hensley

August 2, 2012

For a time, posture contests were all the rage. They gave chiropractors a public relations boost when the profession was fighting for respect. The pageants helped build goodwill and support for licensure, a chiropractic historian says.

Hug says the contests date to the 1920s, but they became the rage during the '50s and '60s. Contestants were typically judged on beauty and poise, posture, and X-rays to evaluate their spinal structure. "In those days, nobody was concerned about radiation," Hug says.

kingstoncommunitynews.com

by Thomas Lamar

July 31, 2012

My problem is that after all these years of going to a good chiropractor, I became very sensitive about when I have a subluxation. It was like this external force was helping me and had become an addiction. Then I suffered when I didn't have it.

Each of our bodies has an incredible inborn intelligence that enables us to adapt to the multitude of stressors that we inevitably encounter each day. Most of the time, our bodies readily engage in this "dance of life" without issue. It's when these stresses become chronic and over-bearing that our bodies resort to adaptations that grab our attention (i.e. they produce symptoms). Often these adaptations are a requirement for vital, bodily functioning to continue - even if it means the adaptation is not ideal for the long-term health of the body.