Cranial Laser and Neurolymphatic Release Technique (CLNRT)
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Chiropractic in the News

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 Title   Date   Author   Host 

npr.org

by Scott Hensley

August 2, 2012

For a time, posture contests were all the rage. They gave chiropractors a public relations boost when the profession was fighting for respect. The pageants helped build goodwill and support for licensure, a chiropractic historian says.

Hug says the contests date to the 1920s, but they became the rage during the '50s and '60s. Contestants were typically judged on beauty and poise, posture, and X-rays to evaluate their spinal structure. "In those days, nobody was concerned about radiation," Hug says.

mercedsunstar.com

by Joshua Emerson Smith

July 15, 2012

YOSEMITE -- The permit process to climb Half Dome has made the iconic destination safer and more enjoyable, according to park officials.

But hikers making their way up the set of steel cables on the final 400-foot ascent must still cope with the inevitable moment when a nervous hiker freezes up, forcing the entire line into a vertical midair traffic jam on the side of the 8,800-foot granite monolith. It is dangerous especially if you're not prepared, said Duane Poslusny, a law enforcement ranger who checks permits using an iPad at the area known as the Sub-Dome.

uniondemocrat.com

by Guy McCarthy

April 11, 2016

For the first time in recent memory and perhaps the first time ever, entrance fees will be waived at Yosemite National Park for nine days, April 16 to April 24, to celebrate 100 years of the National Park Service.

Typical entrance fees at Yosemite are $15 per person on foot, bicycle, horse, or non-commercial bus or van with more than 15 passenger seats, $20 per motorcycle, and $30 per non-commercial car, pickup truck, RV or van with 15 or fewer passenger seats.

sheunearthed.blogspot.com

April 7, 2014

Consider it a coming out, of sorts. It's true. I'm one of *them*. I'm a refuser. For those of you who don't know this already, I feel it's time to just put it right out there and take ownership. My husband and I are the "crazies"...

For fun, ask your doctor to share with you all they know about the ingredients (active and inactive) in the vaccines. Then ask them to show you the package insert for each of the vaccinations your child is about to receive. I have. I can almost guarantee they will tell you, "Don't worry about it. I am the doctor. It's for the best. Do you have a medical degree?" They really won't know or say much more, except to possibly give you a condescending lecture and the crackerjack eye for daring to question their authority. Uhh...as you might imagine, I'd highly recommend you DO question their authority.

sciencealert.com

by Bec Crew

November 11, 2014

Bioengineers in the US are developing the world's first artificial cow's milk made from genetically engineered yeast in an effort to put a more environmentally sustainable option on the market.

Earlier this year, a synthetic dairy start-up called Muufri (pronounced "Moo-free") was founded by two bioengineers in California - Perumal Gandhi and Ryan Pandya. They're working on perfecting an artificial cow's milk made from a special variety of yeast that has been genetically engineered to produce milk proteins.

newsweek.com

August 28, 2015

It seems fitting that a plant called Mary Jane could smash the patriarchy. After all, only female marijuana flowers produce cannabinoids like the potent THC chemical that gets users buzzed.

Pot farmers strive to keep all their crops female through flowering female clones of one plant, called the Mother. And women are moving into the pot business so quickly that they could make it the first billion-dollar industry that isn't dominated by men.

anh-usa.org

July 8, 2014

The New York Times Magazine recently ran a story about a fascinating new product, a spray called AO+ Refreshing Cosmetic Mist, from a small biotech company AOBiome. The spray contains billions of cultivated Nitrosomonas eutropha.

AOBiome scientists believe these bacteria act as a kind of pro-biotic for the skin. Once applied, they become a built-in cleanser, deodorant, anti-inflammatory, and immune booster by feeding on the ammonia in our sweat. The MIT-trained chemical engineer who invented AO+, David Whitlock, noticed that horses will roll in dirt after the getting sweaty: they are actually collecting the bacteria that transform the ammonia into nitrite and nitric oxide.

naturalhealth365.com

November 22, 2015

Most people remain clueless about the real dangers of wireless technology.  Discover what the health experts are saying and how to protect yourself.

Wireless devices emit radio frequency radiation or microwave radiation at the rate of billions of cycles per second. Thousands of peer-reviewed studies point to the link between these exposures and a long list of adverse biological health effects and very serious diseases, including brain tumors, cancer and cardiovascular disease.

collective-evolution.com

by Howard Tseng

March 25, 2015

Signs of magnesium deficiency are everywhere in the United States, if you know what to look for. Unfortunately, the symptoms are so incredibly common that they constantly slip under the radar!

Unfortunately, conventional medicine has not woken up to the amount of research that has been done on magnesium deficiency. One of the reasons Western Medicine is so off base with magnesium is how they test it: with blood tests. Blood tests do not yield ANY information about magnesium... why? Because the body controls the levels of blood magnesium very tightly. If the magnesium in the blood drops just a little bit, you're going to have a heart attack. It's that sample. So to prevent this, the body will rob all of its cells, tissues, and bones of magnesium in order to keep the blood levels constant. If you do a blood test for magnesium, the cells could be completely empty while your blood levels remain constant.

articles.mercola.com

by Dr. Mercola

September 14, 2014

The use of glyphosate, the active ingredient in the broad-spectrum herbicide Roundup, has dramatically risen over the past 15 years, right in step with the use of GE crops.

Dr. Anthony Samsel and Dr. Seneff produced some phenomenal research1 on this connection, which was published in December last year. Previously, she has investigated the relationship between glyphosate and the development of a wide array of modern diseases, including autism. She believes that glyphosate may in fact act as a transporter for aluminum (a common vaccine adjuvant) into the brain. It also appears to transport arsenic into the kidneys. For more in-depth information on this glyphosate-autism link, please listen to the full version of Dr. Seneff's interview.