Cranial Laser and Neurolymphatic Release Technique (CLNRT)
Cranial Laser and Neurolymphatic Release Technique (CLNRT)Palmer College of Chiropractic
Palmer GraduateMember of North American Association for Laser Therapy
Member of North American Association for Laser Therapy

Chiropractic in the News

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 Title   Date   Author   Host 

healthyandnaturalworld.com

by Jenny Hills

November 11, 2016

A receding hairline, the appearance of bald patches (alopecia), or thinning hair can be a disturbing experience for any person, and knowing how to fight hair loss can be a challenge.

Over the last few years, various vitamins and supplements have been promoted to boost hair growth and help hair grow back. For example, biotin, vitamin D, B-complex vitamins, and omega-3 are all said to combat hair loss and help hair regrow.

jenniferschulman.com

by Jennifer Schulman

July 31, 2015

My husband used to be really skeptical of natural therapies like essential oils, until we had to try them for our little ones. He was trained up relying on modern medicine and innovation as the "best way" to take care of just about anything.

However, with a lot of in-home experiments, and a lot of studying the natural, organic compounds and phytochemicals (plant chemicals) that are produced naturally, he has had quite a "turn-around" and has begun to realize the benefits of natural essential oils and remedies, in addition to their diminished or lack of toxic build up and side effects we can get from man made pharmaceuticals. He also made the connection that many pharmaceuticals are derived and manipulated from naturally occurring (often harmless) compounds and the only way major pharmaceutical companies can patent them is to alter them in a lab in order to claim limited proprietary rights to market them. Lavender could be perhaps one of the most versatile herbs and essential oils in the world.

collective-evolution.com

by Jeff Roberts

July 22, 2017

What first started as a headache, fever, and body aches, quickly escalated into an excruciating migraine, debilitating muscle stiffness, and an overwhelming sense of nausea.

I was hit with what I thought was a nasty case of the seasonal flu, and it sucked. But I powered through, drinking my liquids and following the natural recommended flu-protocol, knowing that it would all be over within a few days. My prognosis proved wrong, however. Over a week into my sickness I still couldn't eat, and I was dropping weight like a Jenny Craig story gone right. The only word I could use to describe the feeling in my stomach was "gross." My usually clear skin had broken out, and my urine and stool were also starting to look "off" to say the least, which caused some serious concern.

mnn.com

by Jaymi Heimbuch

April 28, 2016

Considered one of the most photographed landscapes in the United States, The Wave is a sandstone rock formation in the Coyote Buttes near the Arizona-Utah border. Each year, hikers scramble to get one of the few permits granted to hike in.

Only 20 hikers a day are allowed, and tens of thousands of people apply every year to be one of those lucky hikers. But how is this strange, surreal beauty even possible? There are two major troughs: the first is 62 feet wide and 118 feet long, and the second is 7 feet wide and 52 feet long. The troughs were first formed by water erosion, as run-off carved deeper and deeper into stone from the Jurassic age. But as the drainage basin that fed water to the troughs shrank, water flow ceased, and the fascinating formation -- with steps and risers cut high into the steep sandstone walls -- has been continued entirely through erosion by wind as it funnels through the troughs.

womensradio.com

by Janis Prout

December 18, 2012

Ever leave on a trip feeling great but return needing to recover from traveling? Chiropractor Janis Prout sees patients in pain daily. When they're getting ready for a trip, she helps them prepare, but often they return home sore and sadly subluxated.

Back pain from sitting is just one of the issues she helps with. Whether you're leaving on a holiday trip, traveling for business or dealing with a daily commute, she shares tips on how to end your trip in great shape.

healthychild.com

by Jane Sheppard

December 6, 2016

Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), also known as crib death or cot death, is the number one cause of death for infants from one month to one year of age. 90% of all SIDS deaths are in babies under six months old.

Dr. James Sprott, OBE, a New Zealand scientist and chemist, states that crib death is caused by toxic gases, which can be generated from a baby's mattress. He says chemical compounds containing phosphorus, arsenic and antimony have been added to mattresses as fire retardants and for other purposes since the early 1950's. A fungus that commonly grows in bedding can interact with these chemicals to create poisonous gases (Richardson 1994).

greenmedinfo.com

by Jamie Deckoff-Jones, MD

September 23, 2013

Oxygen makes up almost 21% of every breath we take. It is fundamental to life. Without it, we die in minutes. It is an odorless, colorless gas that is poorly understood by most doctors, even though it is regulated as a prescription drug in most countries.

An oxygen concentrator delivers oxygen through a tube to the patient via a cannula in the nose, a simple mask, or a non-rebreather mask. A non-rebreather mask has a reservoir which holds pure oxygen until the breath is taken; it has one way valves to prevent inspiration of ambient air and to allow exhalation gases out so carbon dioxide is not retained. Tanks are quieter, but at the high flows I'm using, need to be replaced frequently. Concentrators are noisy, but easier to move around and never run out, as they extract the oxygen directly from the air in the room. Concentrators can be portable, but most portables only produce 1-2 L/min (liters of flow per minute).

foodmatters.tv

by James Colquhoun

April 5, 2016

A mineral that has received a lot of bad press, salt is actually fundamental to our health. Ironic, isn't it? So why are we led to believe salt is bad? I am blowing the lid on the salt debate.

So here it is: SALT IS GOOD FOR YOU Salt? I hear you say. Are you sure? And this is where the camp of traditional believers might jump in, yelling 'NO. IT'S NOT!'. And they would be right if I was talking about the chemically produced table salt that is added to most processed foods, meats and snacks (that IS bad for you). But I'm not. I'm talking about REAL salt - 100 percent natural salt that is extracted from a legitimate natural source and is not bleached or processed.

afr.com

by Jacquie Hayes

March 4, 2016

When the going gets tough, the tough (and smart) get going to health retreats. This has been my fallback position for almost a decade now since I started searching for ways to reset in an increasingly manic life.

Organic devotees are attracted by the prospect of clean food devoid of harmful pesticides that tastes as it should and a diet built of produce that is seasonal and fresh. But unless you live in Queensland where the culture and the climate make for easy organic pickings, tracking down the good stuff can be tricky. Not to mention that organic food is still relatively expensive compared to conventional produce. Some consider it the domain only of "the rich".

The Salt Lake Tribune

by J. Ann Helms

April 26, 2007

"The South Salt Lake clinic offers K-Laser therapy; [it] uses heat to help with arthritis," Ingraham says.

McDonald says the laser therapy also helps heal wounds. She explains the infrared wavelengths from the laser create a warm sensation in an animal's body at the precise area requiring attention. The noninvasive treatment is used as an alternative to drugs.