Cranial Laser and Neurolymphatic Release Technique (CLNRT)
Cranial Laser and Neurolymphatic Release Technique (CLNRT)Palmer College of Chiropractic
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Member of North American Association for Laser Therapy

Chiropractic in the News

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 Title   Date   Author   Host 

nytimes.com

January 20, 2012

It pounded away at her ear - rhythmic, loud and unrelenting. The noise was always present but seemed to get worse when she lay down or turned her head a certain way. Usually it was just annoying, but sometimes it grew so loud she had trouble hearing.

A few weeks later, she suddenly felt as if she had been hit on the left side of her head with a brick. The pain was blinding. She had to leave work to lie in a darkened room. It was probably a migraine, her doctor told her, giving her a prescription for a drug called Zomig and ordering an M.R.I. of her brain. Neither the medicine nor the scans were helpful. The headache lasted two more days. After that, the occasional migraine would come and go; the whooshing noise remained constant.

nypost.com

by Mackenzie Dawson

June 17, 2015

When a doctor told Susan Levin her 4-year-old son, Ben, was autistic, she was shocked. It was October 2007, and autism wasn't mentioned in the media nearly as much as it is today.

"I remember thinking, 'Oh my God. What are we going to do?'‚ÄČ" Levin recalls. "Everyone knew autism was a lifelong disorder and couldn't be cured." Levin is part of a growing group of people who are paying more attention to diet - organic, gluten- and casein-free among them - as a way to treat the symptoms of autism and other disorders. So strongly does she believe in the healing possibilities of food that she's now a family wellness coach working exclusively with families of autistic children.

nypost.com

by Claudia Gibson

October 15, 2012

The musculoskeletal system - bones, muscles, ligaments and tendons - is the domain of a chiropractor, who treats patients suffering from back and neck pain, headaches, muscle pain and various other ailments.

While most of us know that chiropractors manipulate a patient's spinal column and joints, they also make diagnoses and perform treatments like massage, acupuncture and ultrasound. A chiropractor uses equipment like TENS (transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation) machines, gravity tables and traction devices to help relieve pressure on the spine. They also may advise patients on overall health issues. Chiropractors aim to help their patients avoid the use of drugs or surgery to alleviate pain.

nwitimes.com

by Giles Bruce

September 6, 2017

Dr. Timothy Ames had a traditional primary care practice for a quarter of a century, starting in 1987. He grew increasingly incensed by the bureaucratic obstacles being put in the way of doctors caring for patients.

So he went nontraditional. At his new practice, he doesn't accept insurance of any kind. He charges patients a monthly subscription fee for unlimited visits. He is available by phone, by text, after hours. He explained the difference between the two approaches:

npr.org

July 19, 2016

As companies shun genetically modified ingredients, they're buying more sugar extracted from sugar cane rather than beets. Sugar beet farmers are thinking of going back to conventional beets.

It's all because about eight years ago, nearly all the farmers who grow sugar beets in the United States decided to start growing genetically modified versions of their crop. The GMO beets, which can tolerate the weedkiller glyphosate, otherwise known as Roundup, made it easier for them to get rid of weeds. They really didn't expect any problems. Just in the past two years, though, that's changed. Many food companies have decided to label their products as non-GMO.

npr.org

by Scott Hensley

August 2, 2012

For a time, posture contests were all the rage. They gave chiropractors a public relations boost when the profession was fighting for respect. The pageants helped build goodwill and support for licensure, a chiropractic historian says.

Hug says the contests date to the 1920s, but they became the rage during the '50s and '60s. Contestants were typically judged on beauty and poise, posture, and X-rays to evaluate their spinal structure. "In those days, nobody was concerned about radiation," Hug says.

nj.com

by Tony Dearing

October 29, 2016

The "D" in vitamin D doesn't stand for dementia. Or does it? We know that many older adults don't get enough vitamin D, and that's a problem. It can leave your bones brittle and more easily broken if you slip and fall.

What we didn't know, until now, is that a lack of vitamin D may be every bit as bad for your brain as it is for your body. According to a spate of recent studies, people age 60 and older who have low levels of vitamin D are significantly more apt to suffer cognitive decline.

newsweek.com

by Ryan David Brown

July 28, 2017

Sierra Riddle hands a vape pen to her son, 7-year-old Landon Riddle, on July 10. Landon was diagnosed with an aggressive form of leukemia as a toddler and became the youngest patient in the United States to receive a medical marijuana card.

When Sierra Riddle stormed into the conference room at Denver's child protective services office, the director of the agency was seated there, along with her son's team of doctors, top administrators from the Children's Hospital Colorado oncology department and lawyers. She recalls looking one of the physicians in the eye, defiant. "I'm done with this shit," she remembers saying. "I'm done with you guys bullying us."

newsweek.com

August 28, 2015

It seems fitting that a plant called Mary Jane could smash the patriarchy. After all, only female marijuana flowers produce cannabinoids like the potent THC chemical that gets users buzzed.

Pot farmers strive to keep all their crops female through flowering female clones of one plant, called the Mother. And women are moving into the pot business so quickly that they could make it the first billion-dollar industry that isn't dominated by men.

newsprepper.com

July 22, 2017

Discover the lost remedies used by our ancestors for centuries. And I'm not talking about rare and complicated insights that only a botanist knows.

Lactuca virosa, commonly called wild lettuce or opium lettuce, is a plant with psychoactive effects. Wild lettuce can be found growing freely in various regions of the world including Australia, America, Southern Europe and India. Lactuca virosa has yellow flowers and can grow to be 2 meters tall. The name of the plant stems from its "milk-juice" (lactuca) and from the word poisonous (virosa). The milky sap is bitter, and has a narcotic smell.