Cranial Laser and Neurolymphatic Release Technique (CLNRT)
Cranial Laser and Neurolymphatic Release Technique (CLNRT)Palmer College of Chiropractic
Palmer GraduateMember of North American Association for Laser Therapy
Member of North American Association for Laser Therapy

Chiropractic in the News

Get the pain relief you need! Call Dr. Hall to schedule your appointment for Chiropractic care and Laser Therapy today.

Call: (209) 588-8700 to schedule a consultation today.

 Title   Date   Author   Host 

Pittsburgh Tribune-Review (PA)

by Mary Kaufman

April 10, 2006

With every hand movement, secretary Pat Brigode would flinch at sharp pains she said reminded her of a thick rubber band being pulled and snapped hard. "We added light therapy to my other treatments, and I felt immediate relief," she said."

Professional sports teams and college athletic departments -- including those at Pitt, Penn State and Indiana University of Pennsylvania -- are using light therapy for healing and pain relief. Nursing homes use it to speed wound healing and ease the ache in arthritic joints. Physical therapists and chiropractors say it also works for bursitis, backaches and other muscle and joint pains.

chiromi.com

May 2, 2011

Michigan Chiropractors Win Class Status Against Blue Cross and Blue Care Network

In Michigan Association of Chiropractors and Toby A. Mitchell, DC, v. Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan, the MAC asserts that our members who are or have been participating providers with BCBSM have been harmed because BCBSM has engaged in a practice of not paying chiropractic providers for covered chiropractic services, while paying other non-chiropractic providers for providing the same services. We further assert that MAC members who are not, and have not been, participating providers have been damaged by being discouraged from entering into provider contracts with BCBSM by these same policies, which we believe to be in violation of not only Michigan law, but also the individual provider contracts themselves and the 1999 Settlement Agreement.

chiroeco.com

by Ira A. Shapiro, DC, and Edward C. Camacho, DC

November 20, 2015

A recent study by the American Journal of Sports Medicine found that teens between ages 15 and 19 now account for almost 60 percent of all Tommy John surgeries. This is followed by the 20-to-24-year-old age group.

Most often, these and related shoulder injuries are caused by extreme stress placed on the shoulder by overhand motions repeatedly performed at high speeds. This is especially true for young pitchers, swimmers, and athletes who are not only developing physically but are also continually overwhelmed by repetitive stress to the shoulder and surrounding ligaments, muscles, and tendons. In fact, "Little League elbow" is now a common diagnosis for many 10-to-14-year-olds.

vaccineriskawareness.com

October 30, 2016

It has long been known that vaccines can cause the diseases they were meant to immunise against. For instance, the live oral polio vaccination can cause polio - a disease named vaccine-associated paralytic polio.

Pregnancy was listed as a contraindication to the vaccine and they advised not getting pregnant for 3 months after an MMR vaccine has been given. Since it has been proven that the viruses are secreted in body fluid, it is reasonable to assume that close contact with a vaccinated infant would also confer risk.

News With Views

by Sarah Foster

October 13, 2009

With the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to begin nationwide delivery of swine flu vaccine to 90,000 locations, attorney James Turner filed a complaint in federal court in the District of Columbia for a Temporary Restraining Order.

The suit challenges the Sept. 15 licensing of four swine flu vaccines, alleging that the FDA violated the law in its hurried approval by failing to determine the safety and efficacy of the vaccines as required by law since 1964. Turner told NewsWithViews that none of the procedures that should have been done, and that make up a formal administrative record, had been done.

Market Watch

by The Wall Street Journal

March 5, 2007

It may sound like something out of "Star Trek" but makers of low-intensity "cold" lasers say the devices treat a broad range of pain and swelling, and may even heal a fracture.

Physicians say there is some credible scientific evidence for cold lasers, but beware of exaggerated claims. Be skeptical of very low-powered lasers, such as Erchonia's, which is five milliwatts.

Summit Chiropractic

by Oregon Board of Chiropractic Examiners

March 15, 2007

The Oregon Board of Chiropractic Examiners approves Laser Therapy

A variety of low-level laser and light therapy (LLLT a.k.a phototherapy) is available to Oregon chiropractic physicians as a standard treatment for NMS conditions.

Reliable Answers (CA)

by Annette M. Hall

May 3, 2006

Laser Therapy is a revolutionary treatment option that is providing lasting pain relief from long-term ailments often responsible for years of suffering.

It wasn't that long ago that people with knee injuries were forced to endure surgery and long months of recovery time. Surgery was a dreaded experience and the outcome was never all that optimistic until laparoscopic surgery came along. With smaller incisions came faster recovery times and faster healing. Wouldn't it be terrific if you could get that same healing power without the surgery' Many Chiropractic patients are doing just that.

foodandwine.com

by Pete Wells

November 22, 2013

Extending this astonishing offer was the food writer Corby Kummer. In response to the news that New York City's health commissioner had asked local restaurants to stop using cooking oils containing trans fats.

Lard, he cheerfully reported, contains just 40 percent saturated fat (compared with nearly 60 percent for butter). Its level of monounsaturated fat (the "good" fat) is "a very respectable 45 percent," he noted, "double butter's paltry 23 or so percent." Kummer hinted that if I wanted to appreciate the virtues of this health food, I needed to fry shoestring potatoes or a chicken drumstick. What did I know about lard? Bupkes.

Auburn Journal

by Ryan Sabalow

May 5, 2005

More books, less lockers leading to student pain. On some days, 11-year-old Ryan Wallace of Auburn can barely lift his backpack off the ground.

Ryan makes periodic visits to a chiropractor because the number of books in his pack is too much for his growing frame. "The weight of them is just incredible," he said. "Some days it can be 30 to 40 pounds per backpack."

Cameron Dean, a 6-year-old first-grader at Auburn Elementary, said his mother got him a roller-pack because his regular one was causing painful problems.