Cranial Laser and Neurolymphatic Release Technique (CLNRT)
Cranial Laser and Neurolymphatic Release Technique (CLNRT)Palmer College of Chiropractic
Palmer GraduateMember of North American Association for Laser Therapy
Member of North American Association for Laser Therapy

Chiropractic in the News

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 Title   Date   Author   Host 

forbes.com

by Emily Willingham

August 8, 2013

The connection between being a chiropractor and eschewing vaccines goes back to an emphasis on subluxations as a cause for disease rather than, you know, infectious agents like viruses and bacteria.

Chiropracty subluxated itself into medicine in 1895 when a "magnetic healer and grocer" in Iowa claimed that he'd restored a deaf man's hearing using the approach. The practice is based on the idea that the things that are wrong with you arise from misalignments of your spinal column (subluxations), but the level of adherence to this odd philosophy among chiropractors can vary.

thekitchn.com

by Emma Christensen

September 22, 2015

I find a bowl of egg drop soup to be one of the most soothing and comforting dishes ever invented. You only need three base ingredients to make it, two in a pinch. And yet breathing in that steamy broth and savoring the first spoonful of silky egg curd...

This soup is properly an appetizer. Despite its simplicity, I guarantee that your guests will be overjoyed to see this coming when you walk out of the kitchen. This recipe will make four small cups of soup, but can be easily scaled up if you have more guests at your table. I generally use 1 to 2 cups of broth and one egg per person.

naturalnews.com

by Eric L. Zielinski

May 15, 2014

A recent case study reported in the Annals of Vertebral Subluxation Research suggests that chiropractic adjustments can help reverse and prevent autism and issues related to the autism spectrum.

The patient was an adopted three-year-old girl who was born at 28 weeks weighing 2 pounds, 5 ounces by a woman who had a history of prior drug abuse. After two years of abnormal behavior and receiving multiple "autism" diagnoses from medical doctors, her parents decided to take her in for a thorough developmental evaluation. Five critical items were failed: social/emotional, communication, cognitive, adaptive/self-help and sensory.

traditionalcookingschool.com

by Erin

March 28, 2016

As I type, the wind howls, the trees sway, and the ravens perform acrobatic feats in the cloud-studded sky. March is showing itself to be a lion today, but I can only smile as I read a balmy 39 degrees Fahrenheit on the thermometer.

This wonder oil soothes skin irritations such as eczema, cuts, rashes, burns, psoriasis, insect bites and stings, sunburn, athlete's foot, dry and scaly skin, chapped hands or cheeks, and prevents or heals diaper rash. Thanks to its anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and anti-rheumatic nature, poplar salve helps to relieve the aches and pains of sore muscles, bruises, and arthritis.

naturalwonderer.com

by Erin Ter Beest

March 10, 2014

CDC studies suggest that a lower rate of salt consumption might actually be harmful. People who consume the least amount of salt were actually found to have the highest rates of cardiovascular disease.

The most commonly known additive found in salt is iodine, which has been added to salt for almost a century in order to help prevent thyroid disease. While iodine is important to thyroid health, the iodine added to salt is not a form that is very absorbable by the body and therefore, is largely wasted. When iodine is added to salt, it is necessary for manufacturers to also add in sugar, usually in the form of corn syrup (*GMO alert*). Iodine, in the form of potassium iodide, is unstable when combined with sodium. By adding sugar to the salt/iodine combination, the manufacturer is able to prevent oxidation and keep the iodine stable. The sugar also prevents discoloration that may make salt appear unpalatable. When looking for sugar on the nutrition label for salt, look for the word "dextrose."

naturalnews.com

by Ethan A. Huff

November 22, 2014

One of the primary lessons being learned from the Ebola crisis is that fancy meds and vaccines aren't needed to cure the disease. Simple water, it turns out, is one of the best treatments for the hemorrhagic illness.

Drinking four liters, or about one gallon, of water daily is critical for surviving the infection, say scientists. And rehydration solutions containing water with added minerals like potassium and magnesium are even better for overcoming the extreme shock that occurs when the body loses too much water, such as with Ebola. "When people are infected, they get dry as a crisp really quickly," said Simon Mardel, an emergency room doctor advising the World Health Organization (WHO) on Ebola in Sierra Leone, the second-hardest-hit country besides Liberia. "Then the tragedy is that they don't want to drink."

naturalnews.com

by Ethan A. Huff

May 15, 2014

Kraft Foods Global, Inc. and a food chemical company known as Kemin Food Technologies, Inc. have both propositioned the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)'s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) in recent years to approve the use of propionic acid.

Kemin says its liquid propionic acid and salts solutions, collectively known as BactoCEASE, extend the shelf life of meat products, and protect them against contamination by Listeria monocytogenes. But long-term consumption of both propionic acid and sodium benzoate has been linked to causing serious side effects, including brain damage, personality disorders, gastrointestinal problems, autism, and various other neurological problems. And yet Kemin wants to have these additives specifically listed on ingredient labels as "anti-microbial" nutrients in order to fool the public into thinking they are safe.

margaretrivermail.com.au

by Fairfax Regional Media

May 15, 2013

EVERY year two million Australians are affected by back pain. Chiropractors such as local Sol MacKenzie of MacKenzie Chiropractic are asking Australians to focus on posture during national Spinal Health Week.

Mr MacKenzie said chiropractors used to focus on more technical aspects of healing but were now looking at the importance of diet, exercise and posture to improve health. Many people with office jobs could spend eight hours a day sitting, which created a set posture, he said.

chiro.org

by Frank M. Painter, D.C.

June 5, 2017

I hear it all the time from my patients: "Dr. Smith, I'm eating just like you told me to -- lots of grains, beans, fruits, and vegetables, nothing fatty or sugary. Now you're recommending supplements, too? Taking so many pills just doesn't seem natural.

It's a perfectly valid question, and one which you may have wondered about at one time or another. I'll tell you exactly what I tell my patients: If you want to fight disease and achieve maximum life span, you can't do it with diet alone. You need the extra nutritional boost that only supplements can provide. Lots of folks take supplements nowadays. For as many as 40 percent of American adults -- about 100 million of us -- these pills have become nutritional staples. They're also the backbone of a thriving, $10-billion-per-year industry. In many ways, supplements are to humans what fertilizer is to plants. Give a plant adequate amounts of sunlight and water, and it will survive. Add some nutrient-rich fertilizer (organic, of course), and the plant will thrive.

chiro.org

by Frank M. Painter, D.C.

September 27, 2012

A new study of Medicare cost data completed in June by the well-known Washington, DC-based firm Muse & Associates helps prove the cost-saving impact that chiropractic care has on the current federal Medicare program.

The study, titled "Utilization, Costs, and Effects of Chiropractic Care on Medicare Program Costs," was commissioned by the ACA and is the first study of its type to compare the global, per capita Medicare expenditures of chiropractic patients to those of non-chiropractic patients receiving care in the federal Medicare program. The study utilizes data obtained from Medicare's Standard Analytical Files for 1999--the most recent year cost data is available for analysis. The study's executive summary states: "The results strongly suggest that chiropractic care significantly reduces per beneficiary costs to the Medicare program. The results also suggest that Chiropractic services could play a role in reducing costs of Medicare reform and/or a new prescription drug benefit."