Cranial Laser and Neurolymphatic Release Technique (CLNRT)
Cranial Laser and Neurolymphatic Release Technique (CLNRT)Palmer College of Chiropractic
Palmer GraduateMember of North American Association for Laser Therapy
Member of North American Association for Laser Therapy

Chiropractic in the News

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 Title   Date   Author   Host 

nwitimes.com

by Giles Bruce

September 6, 2017

Dr. Timothy Ames had a traditional primary care practice for a quarter of a century, starting in 1987. He grew increasingly incensed by the bureaucratic obstacles being put in the way of doctors caring for patients.

So he went nontraditional. At his new practice, he doesn't accept insurance of any kind. He charges patients a monthly subscription fee for unlimited visits. He is available by phone, by text, after hours. He explained the difference between the two approaches:

The Arizona Republic

by Ginger Rough

January 31, 2009

Treatments ease Cards' aches, injuries, Keeping healthy over a grueling 16-week season is one of the Cardinals' biggest challenges. Lasers, massage, stretching, acupuncture - you name it, the team uses it to stay loose and ready on game day.

Shortly after joining the team in July, Reed pushed for the purchase of high-tech equipment, including lasers, which stimulate cells and promote healing. Laser therapy isn't new in the NFL, but the Cardinals did not have the equipment on-site.

cnn.com

by Greg Botelho

August 18, 2015

California authorities on Tuesday reported they're looking at a second person with the plague in the state -- and, like the other case, this one visited Yosemite National Park.

The California Department of Public Health announced "a presumptive positive case of plague" involving someone from Georgia who had spent time in early August in the state.

CNS News

by Greg Risling

November 26, 2011

Traditional police work wouldn't have nabbed Dr. Lisa Barden for visiting 43 pharmacies to illegally obtain tens of thousands of pain pills to fuel her own addiction.

Nor would it have busted Dr. Nazar Al Bussam as the top distributor of controlled substances in California over a three-year period in a prescriptions-for-cash scheme. In both cases, a computer database did the essential sleuth work. The program known as the Controlled Substance Utilization Review and Evaluation System has exposed so-called pill mills that also has led to dozens of convictions in prescription drug abuse cases.

uniondemocrat.com

by Guy McCarthy

April 11, 2016

For the first time in recent memory and perhaps the first time ever, entrance fees will be waived at Yosemite National Park for nine days, April 16 to April 24, to celebrate 100 years of the National Park Service.

Typical entrance fees at Yosemite are $15 per person on foot, bicycle, horse, or non-commercial bus or van with more than 15 passenger seats, $20 per motorcycle, and $30 per non-commercial car, pickup truck, RV or van with 15 or fewer passenger seats.

uniondemocrat.com

by Guy McCarthy

November 7, 2015

Tuolumne Utilities District staff are recommending water conservation measures be changed from mandatory to voluntary. This is the second time this year TUD staff have advised relaxing water-saving restrictions.

"We want customers going forward to keep using water judiciously, to try to use the same amount they used November 2013 to February 2014," said District Engineer Erik Johnson. "We're recommending conservation be voluntary, no longer mandatory. We aren't going to be policing it, or issuing violations, or going out and monitoring it."

The Boston Channel

by Heather Unruh

March 3, 2009

BOSTON -- It was one of the hottest holiday gifts for fun and fitness. Doctors are even using it for physical therapy. The Nintendo Wii may cause more harm than anyone expected.

Most people use Nintendo's Wii for fun and fitness. But a growing number of Wii-users are getting hurt. According to The Massachusetts Chiropractic Society, there has been an increase in Wii-itis.

healthimpactnews.com

by Heidi Stevenson

June 26, 2013

Yet another study, this one consisting of every birth in The Netherlands over two years, demonstrates that home births are safer than hospital births. Women are more than twice as lifely to end up in intensive care if they give birth in a hospital!

In The Netherlands, the majority of births occur at home, not in hospitals. A study reported in theBMJ found that women whose pregnancies were low-risk suffered far fewer severe negative outcomes from home than hospital births, especially after the first pregnancy. The study, published 13 June 2013, focused on two serious adverse events: postpartum hemorrhage and manual removal of the placenta, both of which are life-threatening, and also included admission to intensive care, eclampsia, and more than four packed cells in a blood transfusion.

voxxi.com

by Hope Gillette

November 4, 2012

Avoiding the nocive effects of pesticides may be as simple as buying organic foods, states a report from the American Academy of Pediatrics, which conducted an extensive look into organic produce, dairy products and meat.

Pediatricians concluded that, while nutritionally similar to conventional foods, organic foods may be lower in pesticide residue. Lower-levels of pesticides are an important consideration when it comes to a child's diet.

collective-evolution.com

by Howard Tseng

March 25, 2015

Signs of magnesium deficiency are everywhere in the United States, if you know what to look for. Unfortunately, the symptoms are so incredibly common that they constantly slip under the radar!

Unfortunately, conventional medicine has not woken up to the amount of research that has been done on magnesium deficiency. One of the reasons Western Medicine is so off base with magnesium is how they test it: with blood tests. Blood tests do not yield ANY information about magnesium... why? Because the body controls the levels of blood magnesium very tightly. If the magnesium in the blood drops just a little bit, you're going to have a heart attack. It's that sample. So to prevent this, the body will rob all of its cells, tissues, and bones of magnesium in order to keep the blood levels constant. If you do a blood test for magnesium, the cells could be completely empty while your blood levels remain constant.