Cranial Laser and Neurolymphatic Release Technique (CLNRT)
Cranial Laser and Neurolymphatic Release Technique (CLNRT)Palmer College of Chiropractic
Palmer GraduateMember of North American Association for Laser Therapy
Member of North American Association for Laser Therapy

Chiropractic in the News

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 Title   Date   Author   Host 

bloomberg.com

by John Tozzi

August 8, 2017

Steady improvements in American life expectancy have stalled, and more Americans are dying at younger ages. But for companies straining under the burden of their pension obligations, the distressing trend could have a grim upside.

If people don't end up living as long as they were projected to just a few years ago, their employers ultimately won't have to pay them as much in pension and other lifelong retirement benefits. In 2015, the American death rate-the age-adjusted share of Americans dying-rose slightly for the first time since 1999. And over the last two years, at least 12 large companies, from Verizon to General Motors, have said recent slips in mortality improvement have led them to reduce their estimates for how much they could owe retirees by upward of a combined $9.7 billion, according to a Bloomberg analysis of company filings.

health.heraldtribune.com

by Laura Newcomer

May 15, 2014

You might not think to call a balneotherapist when your face breaks out or a reflexologist when asthma flares. But alternative medical practices, no matter how weird they might seem, are gaining traction.

Technically, "alternative" treatments are used in place of conventional medicine; when used alongside standard medical practices, alternative approaches are referred to as "complementary" medicine. The benefits (or lack of benefits) of alternative therapies are far from clear, since there have been few large-scale randomized clinical trials of them. Still, in 2008, more than 38 percent of American adults said they had used some form of alternative medicine. Here is a guide to some of those treatments:

Insurance Newsnet

by PR Newswire

October 24, 2007

According to a new report from the Insurance Research Council (IRC), approximately one out of every three auto injury insurance claimants nationwide receives some form of alternative medical treatment.

In traditional tort liability states, alternative treatment utilization varied widely, from 17 percent in Indiana, to 52 percent in California, for bodily injury liability claims.

pressreleasecentre.com

June 8, 2013

Altamonte Springs Chiropractor, Dr. Erik Roach reveals why most fitness pros and trainers hate him. Most people do not know the truth about weight loss and that is what he reveals.

Dr. Erik Roach of Roach Family Wellness Integrative Medicine, is the owner and head chiropractor of the clinic. The clinic is both a chiropractic and medical center that has helped hundreds of patients cure their pains and cope with certain disabilities. When the general public feels body pain or soreness they think about seeking a chiropractor but it is rare that people think of finding a chiropractic doctor for weight loss. Local fitness pros and weight loss clinics have lost clients because of the truth that Dr. Roach reveals.

The Reporter

by David Henson

December 26, 2005

A couple of years ago, Antionette Staniewicz noticed her blonde-haired quarter horse didn't saunter as vivaciously as she once did, so she called Dr. Troy Stevens to see if he could help.

Stevens, though, wasn't a veterinarian - Staniewicz had already tried that route to no avail. Instead, Stevens was her chiropractor, who she said healed her after a terrible riding accident. "I had such great success with Dr. Troy myself that I wanted to see what he could do for Barbie," Staniewicz said. As it turns out, a lot.

intellihub.com

by Mike Adams

June 1, 2015

The CDC whistleblower story is exploding, and despite the best efforts of the mainstream media to maintain a total media blackout on the story, the truth is spreading like wildfire across the internet and social media.

The essence of the story is that CDC scientist William Thompson has admitted to committing scientific fraud over the last ten years in conjunction with other CDC scientists. They retroactively altered study data to hide the proven fact that MMR vaccines cause a huge increase in autism risk in African-American children, and the CDC's top criminal, Dr. Julie Gerberding, orchestrated the entire fraud.

sltrib.com

by Kirsten Stewart

June 5, 2013

Brandon Babcock, a Utah chiropractor accused of exploiting elderly diabetes patients, is taking his show on the road. The 37-year-old has been traveling to Idaho, Florida and Arizona and holding free seminars in hotels.

The citation is a misdemeanor offense. It's unclear what bearing it will have on his criminal case in Utah, which is set for a pretrial conference next Monday. Babcock had his chiropractic license suspended and is out on $200,000 bail awaiting trial on charges he swindled thousands of dollars from elderly Utahns with a scheme to cure their diabetes.

fhfn.org

by Lisa Marks Smith

January 5, 2014

Lisa Marks Smith was born and raised in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is married and the mother of two sons. She is self-employed, working for Icon Beauty. Following her flu shot and near death experience in 2005, she learned about alternative therapies.

Within days of getting the shot, I knew something was wrong. I called my parents and told them to skip my son's orchestra concert on Tuesday. I wasn't feeling right and didn't want to get my Dad sick before his surgery. When I set up at a craft show with my friend Jackie on Friday night, I complained of a tickle in my throat. I woke up terribly sick the next morning. The first appointment I could get with my family practitioner was Monday. By Monday, October 24th, I felt like I was going to die.

nytimes.com

January 20, 2012

It pounded away at her ear - rhythmic, loud and unrelenting. The noise was always present but seemed to get worse when she lay down or turned her head a certain way. Usually it was just annoying, but sometimes it grew so loud she had trouble hearing.

A few weeks later, she suddenly felt as if she had been hit on the left side of her head with a brick. The pain was blinding. She had to leave work to lie in a darkened room. It was probably a migraine, her doctor told her, giving her a prescription for a drug called Zomig and ordering an M.R.I. of her brain. Neither the medicine nor the scans were helpful. The headache lasted two more days. After that, the occasional migraine would come and go; the whooshing noise remained constant.

forbes.com

by David Maris

October 10, 2012

Pay attention, as I can't say this seriously enough. Last week, the FDA took a drug off the market, and the reasons should send shivers of fear down the backs of consumers, investors, generic drug companies - and the FDA.

The FDA announced last week that the 300mg generic version of Wellbutrin XL manufactured by Impax Laboratories and marketed by Teva Pharmaceuticals was being recalled because it did not work. And this wasn't just a problem with one batch - this is a problem that has been going on with this particular drug for four or five years, and the FDA did everything it could to ignore it. The FDA apparently approved this drug - and others like it - without testing it. The FDA just assumed if one dosage strength the drug companies submitted for approval works, then the other higher dosages work fine also. With this generic, American consumers became the FDA's guinea pigs to see if the FDA's assumption was right. It wasn't.