Cranial Laser and Neurolymphatic Release Technique (CLNRT)
Cranial Laser and Neurolymphatic Release Technique (CLNRT)Palmer College of Chiropractic
Palmer GraduateMember of North American Association for Laser Therapy
Member of North American Association for Laser Therapy

Chiropractic in the News

Get the pain relief you need! Call Dr. Hall to schedule your appointment for Chiropractic care and Laser Therapy today.

Call: (209) 588-8700 to schedule a consultation today.

 Title   Date   Author   Host 

stuff.co.nz

July 4, 2012

Manawatu chiropractor Greg Oke's skills won't be needed at the London Olympics, thanks to a "polyclinic" in London which has put him out of the job.

Oke has been to two Olympics as the New Zealand team chiropractor - Athens in 2004 and Beijing in 2008 - and was also part of the teams that went to the Commonwealth Games in Melbourne in 2006 and Delhi in 2010.

wahpetondailynews.com

June 15, 2012

Many don't think of the chiropractor as a source to utilize while potty training. But it may be one that could pay off the most in the end. If your child is having a challenge getting the hang of it, consider seeing your chiropractor.

Having your child adjusted in the areas of the spine that have nervous system control over the bladder are critical to their controlling of the bladder. In addition, at Hornstein Family Chiropractic, we will give you a full list of the things to avoid while potty training. These things allow the child the ability to hold their bladder without interference.

therecord.com

June 14, 2012

Family doctors working closely with chiropractors to ease a patient's low back pain can lead to fast and effective treatment, a pilot project found.

Doctors reported sending fewer patients for tests and surgical specialists after an assessment and recommendations by a chiropractor during the Ministry of Health-funded study by the Ontario Chiropractic Association. The traditional route is referring patients to an orthopedic surgeon and ordering MRIs to determine if surgery is necessary, a long process and in most cases surgery is not warranted. Meanwhile, a patient can often become inactive out of fear of further aggravating the condition and simply because of the discomfort.

clawson.patch.com

May 16, 2012

The featured question this week: I have headaches a few times a week. They start in the neck, and I usually wind up with a headache by the evening. Is there anything I can do?

As a chiropractor, I see this type of headache a lot. Tension headaches usually begin with some tension in the neck and shoulders and by evening, the tension turns into a headache that is oftentimes at the base of the skull. Unfortunately, a lot of our daily activities are going to predispose many of us to getting these type of headaches.

marketwatch.com

April 27, 2012

Dr. Lee's Spine Center in Queens, NY is urging sciatica patients to incorporate Chiropractic care into their treatment regimen.

According to chiropractor Dr. James Lee, spinal adjustments can help correct the underlying cause for sciatic pain, relieving disc pressure on the sciatic nerve. Dr. Lee is working to raise awareness about the importance of spinal adjustments and other non-surgical treatments for back pain relief.

worldtruth.tv

April 1, 2012

Despite mainstream medical establishments and media outlets portraying multivitamin supplements as worthless and oftentimes toxic, vitamins have led to 0 deaths over the past 27 years.

In contrast, pharmaceutical drugs were responsible for 3 million deaths, topping the death toll from traffic-related incidents. In 2009, pharmaceuticals were responsible for the death of 37,485 people nationwide. The statistics come from the Annual Report of the American Association of Poison Control Centers' National Poison Data System (NPDS), and the findings go against the claims of most mainstream doctors and medical officials, who claim that pharmaceutical drugs are the only 'science-backed' method to 'treating' illness. However, the report highlights the fact that pharmaceuticals oftentimes lead to death and countless other side effects...

chiroeco.com

March 24, 2012

As professional basketball continues to make headlines mid-season and March Madness is underway for college basketball, the Foundation for Chiropractic Progress points to the role of chiropractors in helping basketball players perform their best.

"Chiropractic care helps to give a team and athlete a competitive advantage in whatever sport they participate in. Specifically, it helps to enhance endurance levels, assist in the recovery from many structural injuries and achieve overall peak performance," shares Dr. Craig Buhler, who for 26 years served as the team DC for the Utah Jazz, treating countless athletes including NBA Hall of Famer John Stockton. "By including chiropractic into an athlete's regular health practices, one is able to maximize training and optimize functional balance and skill."

healthcareglobal.com

March 12, 2012

Omni Wellness Center, offers low-level laser therapy (LLLT) to patients suffering from chronic neck, joint and back pain, as well as several other conditions.

The treatment involves targeting injured tissues with a laser set to a specific wavelength that goes through the skin to reach the tissues underneath. Therapeutic laser light falls within a specific wavelength range that can be adjusted to pulse at various levels depending on the depth of the injury.

prweb.com

January 28, 2012

Dr. Jason Schluter, a Tulsa, Oklahoma chiropractor, is offering a year's worth of free care to veterans who are serving or have served in Iraq or Afghanistan since 2001.

Jason F. Schluter, DC, of Tulsa, Oklahoma has joined doctors of chiropractic from around the United States that have answered the call to participate in a new initiative aimed at supporting America's newest returning veterans with immediate access to chiropractic services, in addition to the limited programs officially available through the US Department of Defense.

nytimes.com

January 20, 2012

It pounded away at her ear - rhythmic, loud and unrelenting. The noise was always present but seemed to get worse when she lay down or turned her head a certain way. Usually it was just annoying, but sometimes it grew so loud she had trouble hearing.

A few weeks later, she suddenly felt as if she had been hit on the left side of her head with a brick. The pain was blinding. She had to leave work to lie in a darkened room. It was probably a migraine, her doctor told her, giving her a prescription for a drug called Zomig and ordering an M.R.I. of her brain. Neither the medicine nor the scans were helpful. The headache lasted two more days. After that, the occasional migraine would come and go; the whooshing noise remained constant.