Cranial Laser and Neurolymphatic Release Technique (CLNRT)
Cranial Laser and Neurolymphatic Release Technique (CLNRT)Palmer College of Chiropractic
Palmer GraduateMember of North American Association for Laser Therapy
Member of North American Association for Laser Therapy

Chiropractic in the News

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 Title   Date   Author   Host 

bloomberg.com

by Shannon Pettypiece

June 3, 2013

Shortages of medicines for some of the most common cancers have caused nearly half of doctors to delay treatment and forced about a third to choose between patients needing a particular drug.

The findings from a survey of 250 cancer doctors highlight the anxious situation some of their patients have faced during the past year as manufacturing lapses and changes in the generic-drug industry have cut off supply of key medicines, said Keerthi Gogineni, a cancer doctor at the University of Pennsylvania, who presented the finding in Chicago at the meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. More than 80 percent of cancer doctors surveyed said they haven't been able to get needed medications, including potentially life-saving drugs for breast, ovarian and prostate cancers.

Planet Chiropractic

by Sharon Gorman, DC

August 15, 2006

How important is it that we tell people about Chiropractic? How much urgency do you have about sharing it with others? Most of us have seen the benefit to us in more than just the removal of symptoms.

To most of us Chiropractic has become a way of life. The principles have become a set of principles that we have grown to live with and we allow to guide our lives. When we have a symptom we don't look outside of ourselves for an answer, we look for the cause. We have a certain respect for our bodies and for the intelligence that resides in it. We are pro-active in assuring our good health by including regular adjustments as a way to make sure that our nervous symptom is working the best that it can.

fieldguidetohummingbirds.com

by Sheri L. Williamson

May 7, 2015

A recent visitor to the Field Guide to Hummingbirds Facebook page asked a question that comes up frequently in discussions of the use of petroleum-based food dyes in hummingbird feeder solutions:

Have any scientific studies been conducted to determine the effects of these chemicals on hummingbirds? Some people are surprised to learn that the answer is an emphatic "NO." Despite oft-repeated (and oft-debunked) urban legends that the San Diego Zoo, Audubon Society, or some other trustworthy source tested red dye on hummingbirds and found one or more specific effects (liver damage, kidney damage, cancer, tumors, "birth defects," weakened eggshells, or, in some versions of the story, no harm at all), there is no evidence that any such testing has ever been conducted on hummingbirds by anyone anywhere.

wfaa.com

by Sonia Azad

December 17, 2016

If you have chronic pain in your neck or back, you know how miserable it feels day-to-day. Perhaps your options have whittled down to pain killers, anti-inflammatories, physical therapy or surgery.

There is no cracking or aggressive movement involved in NSA. Lewis and business partner Amy Gunderson focus on gentle, precise touch to your spine and the connective tissues around it. "I honestly was at a point where I was willing to try anything," said Madeline Kiefer, who calls NSA a lifesaver.

Orangeburg Times Democrat (SC)

by Sonja Gleaton

November 8, 2005

Fear, anxiety, frustration, depression. Separation, divorce, bereavement. Life is surrounded by inescapable stressors.

Statistics show that more than 66 percent of all visits to primary-care physicians are for stress-related disorders, and every week, 112 million people take medication for stress-related medical conditions. "Most people eat a healthy diet, schedule regular dental check-ups and eye exams, but neglect one of the most important parts of the body - their spines. By removing vertebral subluxations from the body, the nervous system can function properly, and a person is better able to cope with physical and mental stress," said Dr. Shay.

themountainpress.com

by Stan Voit

April 17, 2013

Dr. John Hood had finished his eighth Boston Marathon and retrieved his complimentary bag in which his clothes and cellular telephone were stashed before the race began. He was about two blocks away when he heard the first bomb go off.

The chaos has begun, and it was so wild that Hood and most of the other racers and spectators didn't know nearly as much as the TV watchers did. They heard rumors that it was a gas leak or a pipe bomb. That didn't lessen the feelings of anxiety among those, like Hood, who lacked information.

realfarmacy.com

by Steve Nubie

December 1, 2016

When it comes to herbal remedies, many of us are familiar with the benefits of Echinacea or purple cone flower as an antibiotic, willow bark as a pain killer and aloe as a topical anesthetic and treatment for skin conditions.

Native American medicine men developed a wheel very similar to the yin/yang of Asian medicine. The use of herbal remedies and other alternative forms of treatment was the cutting-edge medicine of their day. This was a holistic approach to medical treatment that relied heavily on plants and their unique benefits. What follows is list of indigenous plants, trees, fruits and flowers unique to North America that have surprising benefits as defined by Native American tribes. If and when times are tough, it might be good to keep some of these ancient cures in mind. They also are good for everyday needs when you consider how effective some of them can be.

refinery29.com

by Tara Rasmus

January 23, 2014

Recently, we learned that you all have serious opinions about washing (or, more accurately, not washing) your hair when we wrote about a blogger who hasn't washed her hair in five years. Jacquelyn Baers told The Huffington Post.

Well, writer Lauren O'Neal at The Hairpin is here to make a new case for "alterna-poo." O'Neal abandoned shampoo three years ago for a new routine: She rinses her hair first with apple cider vinegar, then with baking soda (she does this routine about once a week).

Market Watch

by The Wall Street Journal

March 5, 2007

It may sound like something out of "Star Trek" but makers of low-intensity "cold" lasers say the devices treat a broad range of pain and swelling, and may even heal a fracture.

Physicians say there is some credible scientific evidence for cold lasers, but beware of exaggerated claims. Be skeptical of very low-powered lasers, such as Erchonia's, which is five milliwatts.

kingstoncommunitynews.com

by Thomas Lamar

July 31, 2012

My problem is that after all these years of going to a good chiropractor, I became very sensitive about when I have a subluxation. It was like this external force was helping me and had become an addiction. Then I suffered when I didn't have it.

Each of our bodies has an incredible inborn intelligence that enables us to adapt to the multitude of stressors that we inevitably encounter each day. Most of the time, our bodies readily engage in this "dance of life" without issue. It's when these stresses become chronic and over-bearing that our bodies resort to adaptations that grab our attention (i.e. they produce symptoms). Often these adaptations are a requirement for vital, bodily functioning to continue - even if it means the adaptation is not ideal for the long-term health of the body.