Cranial Laser and Neurolymphatic Release Technique (CLNRT)
Cranial Laser and Neurolymphatic Release Technique (CLNRT)Palmer College of Chiropractic
Palmer GraduateMember of North American Association for Laser Therapy
Member of North American Association for Laser Therapy

Chiropractic in the News

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 Title   Date   Author   Host 

cleveland.com

by Dr. Daniel Neides

February 20, 2017

I am tired of all the nonsense we as American citizens are being fed while big business - and the government - continue to ignore the health and well-being of the fine people in this country.

I, like everyone else, took the advice of the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) - the government - and received a flu shot. I chose to receive the preservative free vaccine, thinking I did not want any thimerasol (i.e. mercury) that the "regular" flu vaccine contains. Makes sense, right? Why would any of us want to be injected with mercury if it can potentially cause harm? However, what I did not realize is that the preservative-free vaccine contains formaldehyde.

cnn.com

by Greg Botelho

August 18, 2015

California authorities on Tuesday reported they're looking at a second person with the plague in the state -- and, like the other case, this one visited Yosemite National Park.

The California Department of Public Health announced "a presumptive positive case of plague" involving someone from Georgia who had spent time in early August in the state.

CNS News

January 14, 2013

Wrestler Hulk Hogan has filed a lawsuit against the Tampa-based Laser Spine Institute, saying the clinic did unnecessary surgeries that damaged his career.

The Tampa Bay Times reports that Hogan filed the lawsuit Monday. He filed under his real name, which is Terry Bollea. It seeks damages of $50 million. In addition to claiming unnecessary surgeries, the lawsuit also says the Laser Spine Institute used an endorsement from Hogan without permission or payment.

CNS News

by Lindsey Tanner

September 10, 2012

Acupuncture gets a thumbs-up for helping relieve pain from chronic headaches, backaches and arthritis in a review of more than two dozen studies - the latest analysis of an often-studied therapy that has as many fans as critics.

Some believe its only powers are a psychological, placebo effect. But some doctors believe even if that's the explanation for acupuncture's effectiveness, there's no reason not to offer it if it makes people feel better. The new analysis examined 29 studies involving almost 18,000 adults. The researchers concluded that the needle remedy worked better than usual pain treatment and slightly better than fake acupuncture. That kind of analysis is not the strongest type of research, but the authors took extra steps including examining raw data from the original studies.

CNS News

by Kelli Kennedy

June 14, 2012

Private contractors received $102 million to review Medicaid fraud data, yet had only found about $20 million in overpayments since 2008, according to a new report by the federal government.

"Significant federal and state resources are being poured in but only limited results are coming out," said Ann Maxwell, a regional inspector general for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The audits were found to be so ineffective they were stopped or put on hold, according to a report by the Government Accountability Office. The agency studied Medicaid audits performed by 10 companies.

CNS News

by Lindsey Tanner

February 10, 2012

Nearly 1 in 20 Americans older than 50 have artificial knees, or more than 4 million people, according to the first national estimate showing how common these replacement joints have become in an aging population.

Doctors know the number of knee replacement operations has surged in the past decade, especially in baby boomers. But until now, there was no good fix on the total number of people living with them.

CNS News

November 28, 2011

Slovakia has declared a state of emergency in more than a dozen hospitals to ensure that health care is not compromised after thousands of doctors resigned from public hospitals over low pay.

Prime Minister Iveta Radicova, speaking after an emergency government meeting on the crisis, said the measures involve 15 hospitals across the country, including two clinics in the capital, Bratislava. Around 2,000 doctors in state-run hospitals have handed in their resignations, effective Dec. 1, if their demands for higher pay are not met. More than 7,000 doctors work in Slovak hospitals. The state of emergency means the doctors must stay at their jobs or face fines or even prison terms.

CNS News

by Greg Risling

November 26, 2011

Traditional police work wouldn't have nabbed Dr. Lisa Barden for visiting 43 pharmacies to illegally obtain tens of thousands of pain pills to fuel her own addiction.

Nor would it have busted Dr. Nazar Al Bussam as the top distributor of controlled substances in California over a three-year period in a prescriptions-for-cash scheme. In both cases, a computer database did the essential sleuth work. The program known as the Controlled Substance Utilization Review and Evaluation System has exposed so-called pill mills that also has led to dozens of convictions in prescription drug abuse cases.

CNS News

by Derrik J. Lang

November 16, 2011

Link is getting a workout.

Unlike the button-mashing pursuits in previous installments of the popular Nintendo Co. franchise, "Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword" is asking players to flick their wrists, wave their arms and move their hands with the gesture-recognizing Wii controller in order to guide spritely adventurer Link along an epic quest to find childhood sweetheart Zelda.

coconutoil.com

by Raul Lora-Zamorano

February 6, 2014

Simple and routine tasks were becoming frustrating and burdensome. The symptoms persisted and soon the memory issue raised its head. At first it was sporadic, however it began to progress almost in a geometric fashion.

I opened my laptop and started to think. I remembered a friend commenting several years back that his father-in-law who suffered from Alzheimer's had benefitted from some sort of oil. I opened Google search, typed in Alzheimer's, oil. That was it. What followed was a genuine "Eureka!" moment. Up came a literal Tsunami of search results. At first I was bewildered: which should I look at first? Everywhere I looked the words "coconut oil" were staring me in the face. To this day I cannot tell you where I read first. Suffice to say that when I looked up it was 6AM.