Cranial Laser and Neurolymphatic Release Technique (CLNRT)
Cranial Laser and Neurolymphatic Release Technique (CLNRT)Palmer College of Chiropractic
Palmer GraduateMember of North American Association for Laser Therapy
Member of North American Association for Laser Therapy

Chiropractic in the News

Get the pain relief you need! Call Dr. Hall to schedule your appointment for Chiropractic care and Laser Therapy today.

Call: (209) 588-8700 to schedule a consultation today.

 Title   Date   Author   Host 

organicfacts.net

October 23, 2016

Out of the many health benefits of sage, some of the most important include its ability to improve brain function, lower inflammation throughout the body, prevent chronic diseases, boost the strength of the immune system and regulate proper digestion.

Don't let the name of "common" sage or garden sage fool you; this perennial woody herb is anything but normal or average when it comes to its impact on human health. Scientifically known as Salvia officinalis, sage is closely related to rosemary, and they are often considered "sister herbs". In fact, many of safe's health benefits are derived from rosmarinic acid, the organic compound found in rosemary that makes it so powerful.

resilience.org

by Brian Kaller

October 17, 2016

In the last couple of centuries humans have done a strange thing: we've dug the biggest pits, the deepest holes, and the longest tunnels the world has ever seen, all to find the most insidious and subtle poisons known to our mammalian bodies.

What we need is a device that can suck toxins out of the soil and either turn them into something harmless, or concentrate them in something lightweight and removable. No one has much money lying around to invent such a device, though, much less to manufacture millions of them and send them to sites around the world for free. Thus, these hypothetical devices would be even better if they already appeared around the world. It would be best, in fact, if these machines cost nothing to create, and once created could make more of themselves, at an exponential rate. While we're at it, it would also be nice if the devices also prevented soil erosion, fed bees and other pollinators, and provided shade, beauty, a home for wildlife, and possibly firewood.

healthyfoodhouse.com

October 16, 2016

Hunza people are a small population, situated in Northern Pakistan, and are believe to be the healthiest, happiest, and the longest-living people in the world.

These people are the only one who do not know about cancer, give birth at 65, and regularly bath in cold water. According to the AMA Journal, Dr. Robert McCarrison claims that not a single person among them has ever suffered from cancer. We would all like to know their secret, wouldn't you?

foodfacts.mercola.com

October 10, 2016

One of the most wildly popular trees on the planet is the cacao, the plant species from which cocoa - and chocolate - is derived. While some might think cacao and cocoa are one in the same, they're not, exactly.

There's been a lot of discussion about free radicals and antioxidants, but some are unsure of what these terms mean in regard to our health. Exposure to the sun, cigarette smoke, pollution, and toxic chemicals, such as chemical weed killers, and unhealthy foods can all release free radical activity in the body, however they also can be produced by factors like stress, damaging healthy tissue. Antioxidants in the foods you eat reverse that process, helping to combat disease by zapping harmful free radicals. That's where cacao comes in. Raw cacao powder contains more than 300 different chemical compounds and nearly four times the antioxidant power of your average dark chocolate - more than 20 times than that of blueberries. Protein, calcium, carotene, thiamin, riboflavin, magnesium, sulfur, flavonoids, antioxidants, and essential fatty acids are also present. The precise blend of all these elements combined serve to kick in naturally occurring phytochemicals that have incredible benefits throughout the body, such as lowered LDL cholesterol, improved heart function, and reduced cancer risk.

myfibromyalgiarelief.com

by Larsclausen

September 25, 2016

To a large degree traditional medicine focuses on the symptoms of fibromyalgia that occur after the knockout blow. The knockout blow is the original traumatic event.

Bergman's wonderful video seems like a much more reasonable approach. Okay, if the person with fibromyalgia has all these symptoms, how do you take care of the CAUSES of the symptoms, rather than just reducing the pain from the symptoms. This makes so much more sense to me. So, by chiropractice adjustments, and adjustments to diet and gut health, Bergman achieves powerful results.

althealthworks.com

by Yelena Sukhoterina

September 24, 2016

Autism rates in the US have been rising since the 1980s. In 1985 autism prevalence was 1 in 2,500, ten years later it jumped to 1 in 500, and today it is an astonishing 1 in 68 children.

More and more researchers and doctors are raising red flags as they see more evidence that this epidemic is related not only to environmental, food, and water toxins, but specifically to those in vaccinations. In 1995 , the immunization schedule for children had 19 vaccinations before the age of 16. In 2001 , that number is now 28 before the age of 18.

home.bt.com

by Louisa McKenzie

September 16, 2016

Organic food is often cited as being better for your health and for the environment. However, many people are put off by organic food's perceived higher price tag.

This month The Soil Association is raising awareness of organic food and wants you to Organic Your September. However, if you think organic food is too costly, switching wholly or partly to organic needn't be as expensive as you probably think.

draxe.com

September 9, 2016

A heel spur often goes unnoticed or misdiagnosed. What is a heel spur, and how do you heal one? Here are seven natural solutions to heal a heel spur.

A heel spur is caused by the displacement of calcium on the bone that forms on the underside of the heel; it may be one small bony protrusion or a collection of tiny, irregularly shaped growths on the bone of the heel, which is called the calcaneum . Heel spurs are sometimes painful - described as a knife digging into the heel - and other times, a heel spur goes unnoticed and is only detected by an X-ray.  Because knowledge about the symptoms of heel spurs is somewhat limited, it's common that it's mistakenly assumed to be plantar fasciitis . A heel spur is simply the presence of an extra protrusion on the bony surface of the heel, while plantar fasciitis is the inflammation of the plantar fascia - a thick connective tissue band that extends from the heel bone to the heads of the metatarsal bones, which are five long bones in the foot located between the heel and the toes. This connective tissue forms a tie that supports the arch on the bottom of your foot. Strain on the plantar fascia leads to irritation, swelling and then a weakness of the arch - this creates pain at the back of the heel. On the other hand, a heel spur is only observable by an X-ray and is painful when inflammation develops in the tissues surrounding it.

realfarmacy.com

by Anya V

September 9, 2016

According to the World Health Organization, 3.5 billion people suffer from some type of parasitic infection. A parasite is any organism that lives and feeds off of another organism.

Parasites take and utilize your body's nutrients and in so doing, hurt the entire organism. Parasites take on a number of different forms and can thrive throughout the body. They most often live within the human intestines. Some eat your food, making you hungry after every meal and unable to gain weight. Others consume your red blood cells, causing anemia.

articles.mercola.com

by Dr. Mercola

September 8, 2016

Coenzyme Q10 and ubiquinol are two vitally important supplements that many are still unaware of. Risa Schulman, Ph.D., is a biologist and functional food expert who has spent the last two decades researching these and other supplements.

Ubiquinol is the reduced version of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10, aka ubiquinone). They're actually the same molecule, but when CoQ10 is reduced it takes on two electrons, which turns it into what we call ubiquinol. In your body, this conversion occurs thousands of times every second inside your mitochondria — the "engine" of each cell in which energy is produced "The reason it does this flipping back and forth between these two forms of the molecule is that this is part of the process that helps us to change our food into energy," Schulman explains. "This is very important to healthy functioning, and obviously important for all muscles, in particular your heart muscle, which works hardest of all the muscles."